What to Expect

In your search for a veterinary facility, we believe you should expect high quality care as well as great service. Our goal has been to assemble a veterinary health care team committed to providing exceptional client service and veterinary health care.

Your pet’s annual vet check-up will include a total physical exam, with a thorough investigation of your pet’s head, body and tail, and all his assorted cavities. Because even the most cooperative pet may not readily go-along with a tooth and gum brushing, an annual cleaning by your veterinarian maybe in order. Like you, your pet can lose his teeth due to decay and neglect. It’s a good idea to keep an accurate medical diary not only of the procedures and vaccinations your pet receives at the vet, but also of notes on things like your pet’s elimination habits and any physical changes or unusual occurrences. Keep track of small shifts in your pet’s behavior, including urinary marking habits and mood swings, along with diet and routine modifications. When we come to your home, provide us with this notebook. These seemingly unrelated occurrences may help explain results of your pet’s medical tests. Also, if you need to change vets, it’s good to have this journal to provide a complete medical history.

Choose a veterinarian who is calm, compassionate and willing to explain all the procedures your pet undergoes. Try to find a vet with whom both you and your pet feel comfortable.

Your veterinarian may refer you to a specialist, veterinarians who have completed advanced studies in specialties such as internal medicine, surgery, and emergency care, if your pet must undergo a procedure that requires more precise knowledge and experience.

Feline Vaccinations

Vaccinations are a very important part of your kitten’s and adult cat’s health care. All kittens should receive their first vaccination at 6 to 8 weeks of age and continue with booster vaccinations every 3 to 4 weeks until 4 months of age. Vaccinating early will offer your kitten the best protection available against deadly diseases such as Distemper and Feline Leukemia.

The following is a brief description of the diseases that we recommend vaccinating against.

  • Rhinotracheitis – Viral disease of the eyes, nose and throat.
  • Calicivirus – Viral infection of the eyes, nose and throat.
  • Panleukopenia (Distemper) – Viral disease of the blood and intestines. (Often fatal)
  • Feline Leukemia (FELV) – Viral disease causing immunodeficiency and cancer (Fatal)
  • Pneumonitis – Bacterial infection of the eyes, nose and throat
  • Rabies – Viral disease, fatal to man and animals

Kittens should also receive an anthelmintic regimen to treat for intestinal parasites. All kittens and new cats entering your household should be tested for FELV and FIV. Both of these viruses are incurable and deadly.
For more information call our office at 619-592-8955

Canine Vaccinations

Vaccinations are a very important part of your puppy’s and adult dog’s health care. All puppies should receive their first vaccination at 6 to 8 weeks of age and continue with booster vaccinations every 3 to 4 weeks until 4 months of age. Vaccinating early will offer your puppy the best protection available against deadly diseases such as Distemper and Parvovirus.

After receiving a series of vaccines as a puppy, your dog should receive annual vaccination boosters. Keeping your dog’s vaccinations current will provide the best protection against deadly disease.

The following is a brief description of the diseases we recommend vaccinating against.

  • Distemper – Viral disease of the lungs, intestines and brain (Often fatal)
  • Hepatitis – Viral disease of the liver.
  • Leptospirosis – Bacterial disease of the kidneys and liver (Transmittable to people)
  • Feline Leukemia (FELV) – Viral disease causing immunodeficiency and cancer (Fatal)
  • Parainfluenza – Viral infectious
  • Parvovirus – Serious viral disease of the intestines and heart (Often fatal)
  • Bordetella (Kennel Cough) – Bacterial infection of the lungs
  • Rabies – Viral disease, fatal to man and animals

Puppies should also receive an anthelmintic regimen to treat for intestinal parasites. At 12 weeks of age, all puppies should be started on a broad spectrum monthly heartworm medication to prevent heartworm disease and guard against intestinal parasites. Dogs over 6 months of age must be tested for the presence of heartworm before starting preventative medication.
For more information call our office at 619-592-8955

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